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How Much Car Insurance Do I Need Under Florida Law?

Each state has its own unique auto insurance requirements so that residents are protected, should an accident occur. Florida is no exception.

Keep reading to learn what the auto insurance requirements are for Florida drivers.

Required Coverage

You may face harsh penalties if you are caught driving without Florida’s required auto insurance coverage. According to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (FLHSMV), all vehicles registered in the state must:

  • Be insured with Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability (PDL) insurance at the time of vehicle registration.
  • Have a minimum of $10,000 in PIP AND a minimum of $10,000 in PDL.
  • Have continuous coverage even if the vehicle isn’t being driven or is inoperable.
    • You must surrender the license plate/tag BEFORE canceling your insurance policy.
  • Purchase the policy from an insurance provider licensed to conduct business in Florida.
  • Maintain Florida insurance coverage continually throughout the registration period, no matter where the vehicle resides.

Non-Resident Coverage

Your vehicle must have a Florida registration, license plate, and insurance policy if you are a non-resident who:

  • Accepts employment or enlists in a trade, profession, or occupation in Florida; or
  • Enrolls children for an education in a Florida public school.
  • You’ll need to obtain the registration certificate and license plate during the first 10 days of employment or enrollment.
    • Also, you’ll need a Florida certificate of title for your car, unless an out-of-state lienholder/lessor holds the title and won’t release it to Florida.

Consequences

If you do not maintain the required insurance coverage throughout the registration period, you may have your driving privilege and license plate suspended for up to three years. There are no exceptions for a temporary or hardship driver’s license for insurance-related suspensions.

If you’ve been involved in an injury-sustaining car accident through no fault of your own, you may be owed compensation. Don’t hesitate to contact our office right away with any questions you may have.

Call us today at (866) 675-4427 to have an experienced Stuart personal injury attorney from Lauri J. Goldstein & Associates, PLLC evaluate your case.

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